Michigan Bat Populations Decline:

Michigan bat populations decline due to disease as well as man made hazards. Scientists believe both natural and human-made threats to bats could severely impact certain populations of Michigan’s bats over the next decade.  The main threat to the bat population comes in the form of white nose syndrome, causing fungus and destruction of their ecosystem.

White-nose syndrome is a disease of hibernating bats that has quickly spread from the northeast to the central U.S. The syndrome forces hibernating bats to frequently wake, which disrupts their fat storage and mental well-being. This causes them to usually starve to death. Since 2007, millions of these insect-eating winged-mammals have died across 29 states and five of 10 Canadian provinces.  It is very likely we will lose one or two species in the long run. We could even see some go extinct in the Northeast within the decade.

White Nose Syndrome:

The disease-causing fungus was first found in 2014 in Alpena and it has reportedly spread to 11 countries altogether. The most vulnerable to contracting white-nose syndrome are tri-colored bats, northern long-eared bats, big brown bats, and little brown bats.  It is currently estimated that the bat population in northeastern US has declined by 80% since seeing White Nose Syndrome. This sudden and widespread death rate is mostly seen in hibernating bats. The true ecological damages of  population decline in hibernating bats are not yet known. However, farmers might feel the impact.

Bats play a crucial role in keeping bugs off of crops. Therefore allowing farmers to use less pesticides, which is better for everyone. Some farmers are leaving up old barns in hopes of giving bats a place to roost. Another way to help conserve bats is to build bat houses to place near crops. Preserving wetlands or digging new ponds creates ideal living for bats as it attracts bugs.

Bat Specialists of Michigan is proud to be a member of the Bat Conservation International. We take pride in safe bat removal, by following the guidelines set forth to help conserve this great species. For more information on how you can help visit www.batconservation.org. Bats are our business. Call today for your free quote. 248-800-4126